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Positive Parental Partnerships: Providing Effective Home Time Handovers

Did you know?

Making sure that the lines of communication are open between families and practitioners makes families more engaged in the learning process, and paves the way for families to feel comfortable raising concerns about their child, knowing it will be considered carefully by practitioners. It helps families feel more involved in their child’s learning and development and builds a more team-oriented attitude, with both families and practitioners working together to ensure the child is growing and learning in the best environment they can be.

Every carer/guardian is different; while some want a full list of exactly how long their child has slept, what they ate and what they thought of activities through the day, others are happy to collect their child and know that, unless anything is highlighted, there were no major issues through the day.

Photo by Tamara Malaniy on Unsplash

Additionally, with the current restrictions, it’s harder to make sure everyone collecting their child has a thorough-enough handover at the end of the day. So, if you’re just starting out, it’s best to make sure you know the essentials:

  • How much a child has eaten. If a child brings in packed lunches, it will be easy for families to see what they have and haven’t eaten that day, but it’s always useful to make sure they know in case there is any change in the child’s appetite or behaviour.
  • Main activities/learning focus. You don’t need to go into specifics, but make families aware of what their child has been learning about or engaging in that day.
  • How much sleep they’ve had. For younger children with nap times, it’s important families know so they can be prepared for something like a sleepy child if they wouldn’t settle that day.
  • Toileting. Depending on the child’s age and development, they may be still in nappies or toilet training. Updates on either are important – if the child seems to be filling their nappy a lot more or less than usual, or just to update on how toilet training is going and if they had any accidents that day.
  • SEN. For children with extra needs, more updates may be needed for behaviour or health issues.
  • Anxious or new children. If a child has made a new friend or seems to have grown in confidence, make sure the family are aware so they can enjoy knowing that their child is settling in.

Overall, knowing your children and their families will determine what kind of handover you give at the end of the day but, if you’re unsure in the early days, these steps will give you a good starting point to build on.

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