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Let’s Meet the Bard! Romeo & Juliet

Shakespeare is widely regarded as the greatest British writer of all time, but his plays and poems can sometimes be quite difficult to read for adults, so how can we get our Early Years interested? Here is a fun activity based on Romeo & Juliet. It is best suited for older children in any size of group.

Follow our simple step-by-step guide to have a go at this activity today:

What you will need:

Image from Amazon Kindle

Preparing the activity:

  1. Cut out eyeholes in each plate. These should be situated 1/3 down the plate and two holes about an inch in diameter and about an inch apart.
  2. Make small holes at each side of plate using the scissors.
  3. Print the bunny template onto the grey paper/card, the bear template onto brown and the chicken template onto orange. Make sure you have enough for your children. Cut out the pieces.
Image from Amazon Kindle

Doing the activity:

Encourage the children to decide if they want to make a bunny, a bear or a chicken mask (or any other animals you can come up with!). Enable them to select which paint is appropriate for that animal (grey for the bunny, brown for the bear and yellow for the chicken).

Once painted, leave to dry. When the masks are dry you, or both you and the children, can stick the features on (bear/bunny ears and noses, chicken beak and comb) and draw on some detail such as whiskers. You also need to loop the string through the holes on either side of the plates so they can be tied behind the children’s heads to wear.

Now it’s time to read through Little Master Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet! Depending on the ability of your children, this could be an adult-led story time, or more of an interactive task, encouraging the children to count the numbers of items on the pages or identify the numbers shown.

Image from Amazon Kindle

When it gets to “7 masks” talk to the children about the idea of a masked ball; people go to a party but all wear masks so they don’t know who the other people are. A fun game of “guess who” could be incorporated into the story time as children have to guess who their friends are when all wearing their masks. It also presents a fun opportunity to do some animal noises!

Tracking the activity:

30-50 months

Personal, Social and Emotional Development: Making relationships: “Can play in a group, extending and elaborating play ideas, e.g. building up a role-play activity with other children.”

Literacy: Reading: “Shows interest in illustrations and print in books and print in the environment.”

Mathematics: Numbers: “Recites numbers in order to 10.; Knows that numbers identify how many objects are in a set.”

40-60+ months

Personal, Social and Emotional Development: Making relationships: “Explains own knowledge and understanding, and asks appropriate questions of others.”

Literacy: Reading: “Links sounds to letters, naming and sounding the letters of the alphabet.; Begins to read words and simple sentences.”

Mathematics: Numbers: “Counts objects to 10, and beginning to count beyond 10.; Counts an irregular arrangement of up to ten objects.; Estimates how many objects they can see and checks by counting them.”