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How to Write the Perfect Early Years Job Description

Writing a job description can often be difficult. We know what the job entails but how do you succinctly put it down in writing? Luckily, That Nursery Life have put together a handy guide to get your recruitment off to a flying start!

The Job

There are three main parts to a basic job description:

  1. The core of the job – what exactly is the main role, and can it be summed up in one sentence? For example, ‘To deliver a high standard of learning, development and care for children aged 0-5 years.’
  2. The main tasks – what does the role consist of? These should be concise sentences or bullet points describing the key points. For example, ‘To ensure that the nursery is a safe environment for both children and staff.’
  3. Further explanation – expanding on the main tasks to show the scope of the role. For example, ‘To ensure records are properly maintained, e.g. daily attendance register, accident and incident book and risk assessments’.

It is also important to sell your organisation. Remember, you are trying to convince a potential employee that they should work with you, just as much as they are convincing you to hire them. It doesn’t hurt to add in a more informal paragraph, explaining the atmosphere of daily life at your setting, the friendliness and camaraderie of your staff and any fun social activities or events that may happen on a regular basis. Show off how great it would be to work for you, as well as describing the official role.

Photo by Linda Eller-Shein from Pexels

The Person

Next, you need to write a person specification. To begin with, think about who was in the position last (unless it was a new role). Do you want someone exactly the same as them? If so, think about what qualities made them such a perfect employee. If not, find a way to emphasise what attributes are needed without sounding like you’re comparing (i.e. ‘punctual’ rather than ‘doesn’t turn up late’).

It is best to split the person specification into two categories, Essential and Desirable, covering a series of topics such as Qualifications, Experience and Personal Attributes.

On the topic of Qualifications, for example, the essentials would be the legally-required certification to work with children at your setting, while the desirables could include a Paediatric First Aid or Food Hygiene certificate.

If this is your first time writing a job description/person specification, it might be useful to collaborate with your team on what they feel are important qualities in a new recruit.

It is essential that your job description is not discriminatory in any way. You must ensure you do not state or imply that you will discriminate against any of the following characteristics:

  • age
  • disability or long-term health conditions
  • gender identity or gender reassignment
  • marriage or civil partnership status
  • pregnancy or maternity
  • race
  • religion or belief
  • sex
  • sexual orientation

For more information, check out the UK Government guidelines here.

These guidelines should help you produce an excellent job description, ensuring you find those top-quality candidates you’re looking for and making sure they’re desperate to come work for you!