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How to write an Early Years CV

Did you know employers spend, on average, just eight seconds looking at any one CV? You need to make sure your CV is clear, concise and shows off your very best skills!

To start with, do your research. We’ve all been there – you’re applying for so many jobs that you just don’t feel you have time to tailor them to each individual nursery. But tailoring your CV could mean the essential difference between being invited to interview and not. Use the job advert and company website to make sure you know exactly what they’re looking for so you can make it clear how your skills relate.

Photo by Christina Morillo from Pexels

Speaking of skills, sell yourself! It may feel uncomfortable to boast about your own abilities as blatantly as is sometimes needed on a CV, but this is your one chance to draw your potential new employer in. If you struggle being able to pick up on your own skills, try writing about a colleague in a similar role. What are they especially good at? Now turn this around and see if any of this applies to you, or if the exercise has helped you think more objectively about yourself. Make sure you’re honest, though – you don’t want to claim abilities you don’t have and then be caught out!

If there are any spaces in your CV where you were unemployed, make sure they’re acknowledged in your CV. Not mentioning them will lead to an employer thinking you have something to hide or having to ask you in the interview. Be honest but put a positive spin on it! You may have been taking care of your family, volunteering or studying – all of which could be developing the skills needed for childcare.

Photo by Jopwell from Pexels

Finally, check for mistakes! Make sure someone else has given your CV a read through to look for errors. When only spending a short amount of time on a CV, spelling and grammar errors could be what decides whether you’re on the shortlist or in the bin.

Stuck for how to structure your CV? Check out our handy example CV to give you some ideas.