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How to Treat a Minor Burn

Did you know?

70% of all paediatric burns occur in children under 4 years old. Because children’s skin is thinner and more sensitive adults’, they are much more susceptible to burns. A young child can still receive serious burns from a hot drink made more than 10 minutes ago. Therefore, it is vital to be aware of what to do, should an incident occur.

Photo by Roger Brown from Pexels

What to do:

  1. Run the burnt skin under cold running water for at least 10 minutes, if not longer. If the burn is large, make sure the rest of the child’s body is covered up and they are warm enough. Otherwise, they could be further harmed by the cold.
  2. Remove all clothing, including nappies, and jewellery from the site of the burn. Don’t remove anything that has been melted or become stuck to the wound. Be careful – you don’t want to cause more pain.
  3. If the burn is more than a superficial epidermal burn (where the surface of the skin is red, slightly swollen and painful, but not blistered), cover with something clean and not fluffy, such as loosely applied cling film or a clean plastic bag, unless the burn is on the face.
  4. If the burn is a superficial epidermal burn, call the NHS on 111 to check their advice and guidance. If the burn is more than a superficial epidermal burn (e.g. ranging from pale pink, painful skin, possibly with blisters to red, blotchy and swollen skin with large blisters, or skin burnt away with the underneath tissue exposed), call 999 immediately.
Photo by Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels

The main thing to remember is to remain calm at all times to reassure both the injured child and the other children in your setting.

Please note: this is a basic guide from That Nursery Life and should be used only as an introduction. Please always follow the NHS guidelines and check out the below links if you are interested in completing a first aid course:

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