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How to: Treat a Cut or Graze

Did you know?

A cut is when the skin is fully broken, while a graze is when only the top layers of the skin are scraped off.

Photo by Ksenia Chernaya from Pexels
  1. Use running water or disinfecting First Aid wipes to clean the wounded area.
  2. If the cut is bleeding, apply pressure to the area for several minutes using a clean and dry absorbent material.
  3. Use a gauze swab to pat the area dry and cover with a clean, non-fluffy material. A tea towel works well if nothing else is available, but sterile gauze is the ideal.
  4. If the child has cut themselves, avoid touching the actual would and make sure the injured body part is raised above the level of the heart to reduce bleeding.
  5. Using soap and water, clean around the area (making sure any wiping is directed away from the wound), making sure to use a clean swab for each stroke. Pat the area dry before removing the material covering the actual wound and applying a sterile dressing or plaster.

If you find that:

  • A splinter of wood or glass, or any other foreign object, is embedded in the wound
  • The wound seems infected
  • A cut won’t stop bleeding
  • You aren’t sure if the child has been immunised against tetanus
  • The injury is from a human or animal bite

You should seek medical help by calling 111 immediately.

Photo by yang miao on Unsplash

The main thing to remember is to remain calm at all times to reassure both the injured child and the other children in your setting.

Please note: this is a basic guide from That Nursery Life and should be used only as an introduction. Please always follow the NHS guidelines and check out the below links if you are interested in completing a first aid course:

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