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How To Treat a Bump to the Head

Did you know?

Minor head injuries are common in people of all ages and rarely result in any permanent brain damage. Each year around 700,000 people attend A&E departments with a head injury in England and Wales. Of these, more than 80% only have a minor injury.

Photo by Zachary Kadolph on Unsplash
  1. Use an ice pack or frozen vegetables wrapped in a tea towel to apply a cold compress to the injury site. This will reduce swelling and also numb the area, making the child more comfortable.
  2. Make the child sit down and rest.
  3. Once the child is settled, watch out or check with the child for any of these symptoms:
  • A headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness
  • Blurred vision

These symptoms are usually mild, short-lived and should not be too worrying. You may wish to call 111 for NHS guidance just in case.

However, if the child’s symptoms worsen or they display any of the following, call 999 immediately:

  • Unconsciousness (regardless of how short a time)
  • Fits or seizures
  • Hearing loss or vision problems
  • Repeated vomiting
  • Blood or clear fluid from the ears or nose
  • Memory loss
Photo by Victoria Borodinova from Pexels, edited by TNL

The main thing to remember is to remain calm at all times to reassure both the injured child and the other children in your setting.

Please note: this is a basic guide from That Nursery Life and should be used only as an introduction. Please always follow the NHS guidelines and check out the below links if you are interested in completing a first aid course:

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