Latest
Inspiration
EY Info
Tools
Premium Resources
TNL Jobs
About US
My TNL
Content Filters
Reset Filters
Inspiration
Inspiration
The latest and best ideas in early years
Early Years Info
Early Years Info
All about the sector, from A - Z
Tools
Tools
Tools, plans and resources to use everyday
Activity Plans
Activity Plans
Filter by EYFS area & children's ages
Interviews
Interviews
Hear from interesting sector colleagues
CPD
CPD
Up-skill, gain knowledge and develop
Health Matters
Health Matters
Looking after the physical and mental health of practitioners and children
Policy Packs
Policy Packs
Section for downloadable and updating TNL policies
Content Filters
Reset Filters
Inspiration
Inspiration
The latest and best ideas in early years
Early Years Info
Early Years Info
All about the sector, from A - Z
Tools
Tools
Tools, plans and resources to use everyday
Activity Plans
Activity Plans
Filter by EYFS area & children's ages
Interviews
Interviews
Hear from interesting sector colleagues
CPD
CPD
Up-skill, gain knowledge and develop
Health Matters
Health Matters
Looking after the physical and mental health of practitioners and children
Policy Packs
Policy Packs
Section for downloadable and updating TNL policies
Open Filters

How To Safely Cross the Road with a Group of Children

Did you know?

Children under the age of 16 are among the most vulnerable road users, particularly child pedestrians which account for the majority of child casualties across all road user types. In contrast to older pedestrians, child pedestrians are not experienced and well educated about using the road. They are therefore particularly vulnerable to injuries and accidents.

Road safety campaigns have helped reduce child road deaths by 90% since records began in 1979, but six children die and 170 more are seriously injured every month on the UK’s roads. There is a peak in child fatalities and injuries in September and October, the months when children get used to their new route to school.

Whatever a child's age, road safety is one of the most important lessons they'll learn.

Photo by Oliver Hale on Unsplash
  1. Ensure all adults and children are wearing high-visibility vests.
  2. Always cross at a designated pedestrian crossing (zebra, pelican, puffin or toucan) if possible. If not possible, find a place with good visibility and explain to children the importance of being able to see both ways when crossing. Encourage the children to think about why crossing between parked cars is dangerous.
  3. Have children pair up and hold hands in a line, with practitioners supervising the front and back of the line. If possible, have a practitioner supervising the middle of the line as well.
  4. Encourage all children to observe the crossing signals changing and the traffic stopping. Enable them to follow the Green Cross Code by looking both ways before, and during, their crossing – “Look right, look left, look right again”.

The Green Cross Code

  • Find a safe place to cross
  • Stop at the kerb
  • Look right
  • Look left
  • Look right again
  • If the road is clear, cross – don’t run!
  • Keep looking and listening for traffic as you cross.

Here at TNL we’re committed to providing the most useful content to Early Years practitioners. Feel free to get in touch on our social media channels if you found this article useful!

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.