Latest
Inspiration
EY Info
Tools
Premium Resources
TNL Jobs
About US
My TNL
Content Filters
Reset Filters
Inspiration
Inspiration
The latest and best ideas in early years
Early Years Info
Early Years Info
All about the sector, from A - Z
Tools
Tools
Tools, plans and resources to use everyday
Activity Plans
Activity Plans
Filter by EYFS area & children's ages
Interviews
Interviews
Hear from interesting sector colleagues
CPD
CPD
Up-skill, gain knowledge and develop
Health Matters
Health Matters
Looking after the physical and mental health of practitioners and children
Policy Packs
Policy Packs
Section for downloadable and updating TNL policies
Content Filters
Reset Filters
Inspiration
Inspiration
The latest and best ideas in early years
Early Years Info
Early Years Info
All about the sector, from A - Z
Tools
Tools
Tools, plans and resources to use everyday
Activity Plans
Activity Plans
Filter by EYFS area & children's ages
Interviews
Interviews
Hear from interesting sector colleagues
CPD
CPD
Up-skill, gain knowledge and develop
Health Matters
Health Matters
Looking after the physical and mental health of practitioners and children
Policy Packs
Policy Packs
Section for downloadable and updating TNL policies
Open Filters

How to Market Your Early Years Setting Through Blogging

The Basics

Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn are great for shorter, more newsflash-like posts about your Early Years setting, but if you want to post something more in-depth, blogging may be the way to go.

Blogs can develop your online presence, show more of your setting’s (and your) personality and help engage with your audience. They can range from articles about industry expertise, product reviews or even serve as a diary. If you haven’t already seen it, check out That Nursery Life’s own Practitioner Diary by Anna McCallum.

The Benefits

The beauty of using a blog to promote your Early Years setting is that you aren’t limited by post length. Far from the reactive snippets of interaction you find on other social media, a blog is where you can really get into the finer details of a topic and present a well-rounded article.

Photo by Damian Zaleski on Unsplash

The Way to Start

To begin with, you need to decide what your blog will be and who will be contributing. From a diary, like TNL, or case studies of successful lesson plans or activities with your Early Years, the options are endless. Deciding from the start who will be writing will also be helpful in the long-run. If multiple people want to contribute then that’s great, but a blog is a big commitment, so be prepared if you’re the only one wanting to write.

The best site to use to begin your blog is Wordpress. Used by more than 39% of all websites, Wordpress is the most trusted blogging platform around, and is regularly used by big brands like Time Magazine and the BBC. Wordpress is free, easy to use and can be customised to suit your needs.

The Advertising

If you’ve read the other articles in this series, you’ll be familiar with how to advertise on other social media platforms (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn) which is great, because that’s how best to advertise your blog! Sharing snippets, screenshots and links to your blog on other social media is the best way to get the word out about your new post, so get sharing!

Photo by Pexels

Top Blogging Tips:

  • Don’t over-promise. A common rookie error is to state you’ll update your blog weekly, then realise you don’t have the time and/or enough subject matter to write about so regularly.
  • Identify what your followers will want to read. Will families want to know more about their children’s day-to-day life, or more about the practitioners taking care of them?
  • Write like you talk. The best way to promote your setting is to show how great you, and your team, are. People will want to hear from the practitioners themselves, rather than a more removed, robotic voice.
  • Specific posts should still tie in to the goal of your blog – to promote your setting. Use any subject matter to your advantage.
  • Break up your text with titles and separate paragraphs. A huge wall of text is both intimidating and boring for the reader.
  • Use examples, references and research to back up your expertise and why what you’re saying is important.
  • Make sure any quotes from books or other websites are referenced accurately.
  • Take the time to proofread or get someone else to check your writing before posting. Spelling and grammar mistakes instantly make you sound much less professional.

Bearing all this in mind, a blog is a great way to provide a real window into your Early Years setting, showing the strengths of your facilities and team, and giving families more information about what you do and why.