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Handprint Wreath

This fun activity will end up in a festive display for your Early Years to admire their own hand-iwork! (you’re fired, Ed.) It is suitable for older children in any size of group!

Follow our simple step-by-step guide to have a go at this activity today:

What you will need:

  • Green card (can be varying shades of green)
  • Wreath frame (you can find one here)
  • Red pompoms (something like these)
  • PVA glue
  • Pencil
  • Black pen

Preparing the activity:

There isn’t any prep for this one but, in the case of younger children who can’t use scissors, you may want to plan two sessions so you have time to do the cutting-out yourself.

Doing the activity:

Using the pencil, help the children each draw around one of their hands on the card (making sure to note down whose is whose!) and help them if necessary to cut out the shape. These will be the holly leaves for your wreath. The handprints will have to cover all the wreath so children can have multiple handprints each.

Depending on the children’s ability, you could encourage them to draw around and cut out their own handprints, with supervision, or if they aren’t able to handle scissors yet or aren’t that interested, you could always cut out for them.

Once cut out, spread some glue on the palm of the handprints. This way, if they want, the children are able to add a few pompom ‘berries’ to their holly leaves. With the black pen, write the name of each child on their handprint.

Original image by Yayimages, edited by TNL

Spread glue on the back of the handprints and stick to your wreath (it might help to work out the layout before sticking down!). Make sure everyone’s name is well displayed.

Finally, find somewhere to display your wreath!

Adapting the activity:

While a holly wreath is synonymous with Christmas, handprints can be used for any occasion. For a secular version, a handprint bunch of flowers could be displayed in your classroom, or handprint balloons! The children will naturally have their own ideas about what pictures they want to make.

Tracking the activity:

30-50 months

Physical Development: Moving and Handling: “Uses one-handed tools and equipment, e.g. makes snips in paper with child scissors.”

Expressive arts and design: Exploring and using media and materials: “Uses various construction materials.; Realises tools can be used for a purpose.”

40-60+ months

Physical Development: Moving and Handling : “Uses simple tools to effect changes to materials.; Handles tools, objects, construction and malleable materials safely and with increasing control.; Shows a preference for a dominant hand.”

Expressive arts and design: Exploring and using media and materials: “Manipulates materials to achieve a planned effect.; Uses simple tools and techniques competently and appropriately.; Selects tools and techniques needed to shape, assemble and join materials they are using.”