Latest
Inspiration
EY Info
Tools
Premium Resources
TNL Jobs
About US
My TNL
Content Filters
Reset Filters
Inspiration
Inspiration
The latest and best ideas in early years
Early Years Info
Early Years Info
All about the sector, from A - Z
Tools
Tools
Tools, plans and resources to use everyday
Activity Plans
Activity Plans
Filter by EYFS area & children's ages
Interviews
Interviews
Hear from interesting sector colleagues
CPD
CPD
Up-skill, gain knowledge and develop
Health Matters
Health Matters
Looking after the physical and mental health of practitioners and children
Policy Packs
Policy Packs
Section for downloadable and updating TNL policies
Content Filters
Reset Filters
Inspiration
Inspiration
The latest and best ideas in early years
Early Years Info
Early Years Info
All about the sector, from A - Z
Tools
Tools
Tools, plans and resources to use everyday
Activity Plans
Activity Plans
Filter by EYFS area & children's ages
Interviews
Interviews
Hear from interesting sector colleagues
CPD
CPD
Up-skill, gain knowledge and develop
Health Matters
Health Matters
Looking after the physical and mental health of practitioners and children
Policy Packs
Policy Packs
Section for downloadable and updating TNL policies
Open Filters

Early Years Calendar: Make a St. George’s Day Dragon!

St. George’s Day, Friday 23rd April 2021

St George

What is St. George’s Day?

St. George's Day in England remembers St. George, England's patron saint. The 23rd of April is the anniversary of his death and is seen as England's national day. According to legend, he was a soldier in the Roman army who killed a dragon and saved a princess.

For a short, child-friendly explanation of the St. George and the dragon legend, check out this video:

Time to make a dragon!

This is a fun, creative activity to celebrate St. George’s Day. It is best suited for older children in any size of group.

Follow our simple step-by-step guide to have a go at this activity today:

What you will need:

  • Toilet roll tubes
  • Green paint
  • Paintbrushes
  • Polystyrene or cotton balls
  • Black marker pen
  • PVA glue
  • Red, orange or yellow (or a mixture of all three) crepe paper (you can find some here)

Preparing the activity:

1. Cut the crepe paper into strips about 30cm long and 3cm wide, as this is one of the trickier parts of the activity.

Doing the activity:

Help your children to paint their toilet roll tubes green and leave to dry. Once dry, use the PVA glue to stick two cotton wool balls on top of the toilet roll tube (as it’s lying lengthways on the table) for eyes.

Use the black marker pen to mark pupils on the eyes, and then two slit nostrils at the other end of the tube.

Using the PVA glue, help the children stick a few strips of crepe paper to the inside of the tube (so they hang out the dragon’s mouth) for the dragon fire.

During the activity, encourage the children to discuss the legendary monsters – do they think dragons would be scary or good as a pet? What do they think their scaly skin would feel like? Have any of the children ever pet a lizard or snake, for reference? What noise do they think a dragon would make?

Once finished, it’s time to be dragons! Holding the dragon faces up to their mouths and roaring through the tube, the children can be fire-breathing dragons, like the one St George fought!

Tracking the activity:

30-50 months

Communication and Language: Speaking: “Uses talk to connect ideas, explain what is happening and anticipate what might happen next, recall and relive past experiences.; Builds up vocabulary that reflects the breadth of their experiences.; Uses talk in pretending that objects stand for something else in play, e,g, ‘This box is my castle.’”

Expressive arts and design: Being imaginative: “Builds stories around toys, e.g. farm animals needing rescue from an armchair ‘cliff’.; Uses available resources to create props to support role-play.”

40-60+ months

Communication and Language: Speaking: “Uses language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences in play situations.; Introduces a storyline or narrative into their play.”

Expressive arts and design: Being imaginative: “Introduces a storyline or narrative into their play.; Plays alongside other children who are engaged in the same theme.; Plays cooperatively as part of a group to develop and act out a narrative.”