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A Healthy Easter Egg Hunt!

Want an Easter egg hunt without filling your little ones with tonnes of chocolate? Why not try our crafty, healthy egg hunt?

This one-off activity will enable children to flex their creative muscles, get them exploring and promote healthy eating! What could be better? It is best suited for older children in any size of group.

Follow our simple step-by-step guide to have a go at this activity today:

Photo by Frank Zhang on Unsplash

What you will need:

  • Reusable cardboard or wooden eggs (we’d recommend these from Craft Shapes).
  • Yellow, orange, green, red and purple paints (colours can vary depending on what fruit/veg you have).
  • Fruit or vegetables with distinctive colours, such as: bananas and sweetcorn; oranges and carrot sticks; kiwi fruit and cucumber; strawberries and red peppers; and red grapes and aubergine.
  • Coloured bowls (to correspond with the paints and food).

Preparing the activity:

  1. Depending on time and the ability of your children, you can either make a craft activity of painting even numbers of the eggs each colour, or paint them in advance yourself. If you’re really in a squeeze then you can always buy some coloured plastic eggs, but these aren’t so good for the environment. You will need enough so that every child can have each colour of egg.
  2. Once dry, hide the eggs around the setting.
Photo by Trang Doan from Pexels, edited by TNL

Doing the activity:

If painting the eggs with the children, apart from needing even numbers of all the colours, they can be as creative as possible! Stripes, dots, criss-cross patterns, cow-patches and splodges – your Early Years’ egg designs can be as detailed or fancy as they like!

Encourage the children to find the eggs – they need one of each colour. Depending on the age and ability of your children you may need to accompany them on their egg hunt, but enable them to be as independent as possible. The children may have to exercise some self-restraint as they learn they can’t take all the yellow eggs for themselves.

Once they’ve collected their eggs, the children can swap each one for some of the coloured fruit and vegetables.

Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash

This is a great time for discussions about what fruit and vegetables the children like or haven’t tried yet. Encourage a conversation about the colours, flavours and textures of each piece of food. It's also an excellent opportunity to talk about how yummy and healthy all of the foods are. One of the great opportunities that this activity provides is modelling good eating habits and establishing a positive emotional association between fruit and vegetables. Again, don’t forget that watch-word: modelling. Don’t be afraid to model good behaviour and enjoy some of the snacks yourself!

Tracking the activity:

22-36 months

Physical Development: Moving and Handling: “Shows control in holding and using jugs to pour, hammers, books and mark-making tools.”

Physical Development: Health and self-care: “Feeds self competently with spoon.”

Expressive arts and design: Exploring and using media and materials: “Experiments with blocks, colours and marks.”

30-50 months

Physical Development: Moving and Handling: “Draws lines and circles using gross motor movements.; Uses one-handed tools and equipment, e.g. makes snips in paper with child scissors.”

Expressive arts and design: Exploring and using media and materials: “Explores colour and how colours can be changed.”

40-60+ months

Physical Development: Moving and Handling: “Uses simple tools to effect changes to materials.; Handles tools, objects, construction and malleable materials safely and with increasing control.”

Physical Development: Health and self-care: “Eats a healthy range of foodstuffs and understands need for variety in food.”

Expressive arts and design: Exploring and using media and materials: “Manipulates materials to achieve a planned effect.”

Expressive arts and design: Being imaginative: “Chooses particular colours to use for a purpose.”